Turning Anger into Fuel

Awaking to the news that last night’s terrorist attacks in Turkey had proven fatal, I awaited the usual stream of reactionist posts to fill up my Facebook and Twitter feeds. You probably know the ones I mean. ‘Muslims are all evil! Bomb the crap out of them!’ Yadda yadda yadda. Instead, there was virtually no mention of what had happened. The attacks in Paris and Brussels prompted huge outcries on social media; where were they for Turkey?

It dawned on me that we (as western civilisation) don’t tend to care about suffering unless it affects us. If it happens in parts of the world that are far away or with different cultural values, we ignore it. It takes attacks by the likes of IS happening on our doorstep to galvanise us into action. We care only when our own are hurt.

As it stands 41 people are dead. Murdered by cowards who are in fact opposed by Muslims as well. Let’s not lose sight of who the enemy is – it’s blind hate, and misdirected anger, and hasty generalisations.

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11 thoughts on “Turning Anger into Fuel

  1. I so agree! I’m a teacher, and I was telling my children about refugees and why they need to flee. It was soon after the Paris attacks, and I was like, ‘Did you know there were three other, much larger, bombings that same week?’ And they were shocked. Then I was like, ‘I guarantee you, if I go on Al Jazeera right now, I’ll be able to bring up a terrorist attack – whether it’s a shooting massacre, a suicide bomber, or a bomb planted.’ They didn’t believe me, so I did.
    Front page. Hundreds of people killed in Afghanistan. Never heard of it, full stop, in mainstream media.
    Like you said … no one seems to care unless it’s a Western country. No one seems to care unless the victims are ‘Christian’ and ‘white’.
    Great post.

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  2. I’m glad you noticed that there was no mention of this too. If it’s not a place that people go to on vacation or for study abroad then they don’t give a damn. 41 people were killed and no one is talking about it at all, it’s ridiculous.

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  3. A bit I wrote up as an introduction to an article on FB:

    “President Recep Tayyip Erdogan condemned the attack in a statement. “I hope the attack at the Ataturk airport will be a turning point in the world, and primarily for the Western states, for a joint struggle against terror organizations,”Mr. Erdogan said, adding that the attack “revealed the dark face of terror organizations targeting innocent civilians.””

    It’s sad, but the President’s wishes will probably go unheeded. If we haven’t learned after the attacks on our country, it’s doubtful we’ll learn after a country a lot of people in the U.S. can’t even locate on a map is attacked.

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      1. I wish I had a fraction of your confidence. Unfortunately, as an American, I’m painfully aware that many of my countrymen & women are selfish, self-centered, & self-absorbed.

        Still, I’ll do my best to pressure my friends, acquaintances, & the audience I reach whenever & where-ever to do something… another issue I see is that our lawmakers, who might have some semblance of power in these situations, are bloody useless. 😦

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  4. You do give me hope. This election cycle & a lot of nasty people online has taken a lot out of me & a lot of my optimism has faded. But, taking solace in your hopefulness makes me feel like I can keep trying to press forward to try & convince my countrypeople & (mostly idiot) lawmakers to address global terrorism, even when it takes place in a Middle Eastern country. 😀

    Thank you for that.

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